Building the deck

July 15, 2009

Dave helped us get the first strips on – then it took Sarah and I a while to get a system to get the angles right for the “king plank”  (two strips glued together that go up the middle of the boat) and after working with quite a few templates we actually cut them and glued them … it was traumatic because I was afraid that they would be too short.  The cut was good (not perfect)… thank goodness!   Small gaps will be filled in with epoxy.  Most of the rest will be dark cedar … hopefully we will get better at the angles but we will be working with shorter pieces so it should be easier.
The first strips!

The first strips!

king plank

king plank

The bow angles

The bow angles

The stern angles

The stern angles

Prepping for the deck

July 15, 2009

The forms are inserted to prepare for building the cedar strip deck.  Dave helped me get these all hot glued in.  They are temporary forms that come out after all the strips are on.

Inserting the temporary forms

Inserting the temporary forms

I am glad someone is reading the directions!

I am glad someone is reading the directions!

Sanding the hull

July 15, 2009

The boat is flipped over and the hull is lightly sanded to remove any epoxy drips and imperfections.

I was a bit worried about the look of some of the puzzle joints but with some advice from the folks on the builders forum – I sanded them smooth and once the epoxy was applied to the hull the ugliness disappeared.

IMG_3124

before sanding - had the impression of the plastic in it

before sanding - had the impression of the plastic in it

A coat of epoxy in the cockpit and layer of fiberglass was added – giving extra strength to the area where I will sit.

IMG_3123

All the seams had to be glued and filleted – “fill it” not like you do to a fish!  The wires come out once seams are glued. A layer of fiberglass tape was added to cover each of the fillets.  Once the glue – “epoxy mixed with wood flour” dried it really tightened up the whole structure.

glued seams

glued seams

Now the fun begins

July 15, 2009

The panels all had to be beveled so when the hull comes together it fits tight.  I had a hard time with the angles but it started to make more sense when the the panels were held in place.  The plywood panels come with tiny pre-drilled holes so that you can run a small copper wire through the holes to stitch the hull together.  Dave helped me with this part – it required more than one set of hands.  He helped trim the sheer clamp at the bow and the stern so that everything comes together.  The Japanese pull saw came in handy for this part. 

Once it was stitched together – it really looked like a boat.

The bottom is all stitched together

The bottom is all stitched together

Lots of little copper wires to poke you with.

Lots of little copper wires to poke you with.

Sheer Clamp

July 15, 2009

Puzzle joint on the side

Puzzle joint on the side

I couldn’t figure out why it is called a sheer clamp … but I scarfed 2 sheer clamps together so that they were as long as the top of the side panels and then glued them to the side panels.  I can see that you need alot of clamps!

Use your imagination....

Use your imagination....

First Steps

July 15, 2009

My first steps were to sort out all the “stuff”.  The sides and the botton are put together like a puzzle.  The “puzzle pieces”  are glued together with epoxy and fiberglass tape.  This was my first time working with epoxy – it is pretty amazing stuff.

The boxes are opened

July 15, 2009

I finally had enough nerve to open the boxes.  I was amazed that a boat will be born from a few pieces of marine plywood and cedar strips.  I started reading the manual and realized that this is going to be a long-term commitment!